The Student News Site of Legacy High School

Lightning Letter

The Student News Site of Legacy High School

Lightning Letter

The Student News Site of Legacy High School

Lightning Letter

Chicago: Teen Edition poster from the Legacy High School Thespians
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Lindsay Uba, President • March 20, 2024
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Rowan Eagar, Writer • March 12, 2024
Chicago: Teen Edition poster from the Legacy High School Thespians
Legacy's Musical Production: Chicago
Lindsay Uba, President • March 20, 2024
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Lindsay Uba, President • February 5, 2024
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Lindsay Uba, President • December 10, 2023

3D Shapes in Desmos

3D+Shapes+in+Desmos
Colin Womack

A few months back, I made the Desmos Ferris wheel and gave myself a harder task: make a rotating three-dimensional cube.

After mulling this over for a while, I had an idea. If I animated a point going around on a circle, then divided every sine by 2, then added 3 more points 90 degrees apart, I would essentially have the top of a spinning cube.

After some time and work, I added 4 lines connecting these points. This was extremely difficult, as the end of the lines would never be equal to the same point , or go into negative space. Negative space is where the bounds of a line cross one another, and the line disappears. For example, if I had a line that was y=x+3, with bounds of {2 < x < g}, when g goes under 2, there would be no valid spaces to show the line. I eventually fixed this by making the circle only turn 90 degrees at a time, so that the points didn’t cross one another in the Y direction.  If they did, I would make it so that the variable in the bounds was x.

Example of negative space:

https://www.desmos.com/calculator/ysnch6mfkb

After I got this figured out, all that was left was to copy and paste the equations two spaces below and add vertical lines connecting up the upper and lower faces. Now, I had a spinning three-dimensional cube in Desmos.

Link to graph:

https://www.desmos.com/calculator/w0bgtutc4w 

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Colin Womack, Writer
Colin Womack is a pretty cool guy who works for the Legacy Newspaper. He plays too much Minecraft. He is also bad at making a creative biography.    
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